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Got my dentures 5 days ago....?

On Health & Drugs & Medications » Dental

20,922 words with 11 Comments; publish: Fri, 14 Dec 2007 12:09:00 GMT; (90078.13, « »)

Had all my teeth pulled and dentures put right on five days ago. Went the next day back for my post op. Dentist put some soft reliner stuff on the dentures and now I feel like Mr. Ed the talking horse. My teeth are too far down and it makes it hard to close my mouth. I'm wondering if they will adjust as my gums heal?

I only have 4 vicidon left, and I don't think they will give me more. If I don't take it the pain is terrible. I hope every day it will get better so I can handle it. Right now I just feel like crying but I even that will hurt. I'm also taking motrin and a antibiotic because one tooth hole goes up into my sinus. My molars had "fishhook" roots so had to be drilled in half and cut out. Three molars they broke off at the gum line. By the time they were down to pulling my last two teeth novacaine was wearing off/not working and they ended up pulling them while I screamed and gripped the chair...That was not fun. They did give me two ativan pills to take. One the night before, said someone would have to wake me up. HA!! I took it at 10:00pm and woke up bright and early at 3:30am! Took the second pill 2 hours before appointment and it did nothing for me. That was a big dissappointment. Sitting in the chair for 4 1/2 hours while the dentist pulls my teeth fully awake is not something I will ever do again...lucky thing they pulled all my teeth.

Any tips on helping the pain from here on out?

Are my teeth going to slip more onto my gums so I don't resemble a horse?

I do like how white the teeth are, just not how the teeth sit in my mouth.I am living off of canned chicken shredded with mayo,pudding, and diet pop (really cold pop...that is a treat!)

frisfluf

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  • 11 Comments
    • well i think i have good news and bad news. good news is pain goes away and the bad news is the teeth are there to stay. Find a new dentists and get a second opinion.
      #1; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 15:43:00 GMT
    • Hi Frisfluf, :wave:

      Sorry to hear about your ordeal. I know this is something you won't want to hear but I get the impression your dentist is not good at treating denture patients and fitting dentures. X-rays should have revealed some clues of your "fish hook" roots and the proximity of the sinus'. You should have been referred to an oral surgeon. If your dentist is an oral surgeon (mine was) he/she should have used a more appropriate sedation method or spread the extractions over a number of visits. You should never have had to endure what you did. But that, as they say, is water under the bridge. I hope that you trust your dentist enough to continue with your treatment plan.

      The first thing you need to do is manage your pain. Ask your dentist for a refill of your pain medicine, at least another weeks worth. It sounds like you're going to need it. If you're really in pain and he/she refuses then you're better off seeing another dentist that actually cares about whether you're in pain or not. Immediate dentures should be worn 24/7 (except for cleaning and rinsing) for some time after the extractions but not if they're painful to wear. Take them out if they hurt to wear. Rinse your mouth with salt water often (about a teaspoon of salt to a cup of water). It promotes healing and is actually quite soothing. Ice packs could help reduce swelling as well.

      The "hores teeth" effect is a common complaint. It's usually a result of the gums being swollen and pushing the dentures up for the lower denture and down for the upper denture. Your dentist shouldn't have given you a soft reline so soon after the extractions either. Most new denture wearers have their first soft reline after two or three weeks when the swelling from extractions is gone and the gums begin to resorb (shrink). If anything, the soft reline probably only made your "horse teeth" effect worse by adding more thickness between your gums and the denture. If you still have "horse teeth" after all the swelling is gone and your gums are resorbing then you'll know there is a problem with the dentures. Try to be patient until then.

      It sounds like your initial healing period will be longer than normal. But normal or not, healing from multiple extractions and adapting to dentures will take time. What's most important for you now is to get relief from your pain and have your gums heal properly. Dentures can be adjusted or remade to fit properly so that should be a secondary consideration at this point. If you have any other questions please ask. Good luck!

      Yos

      (full upper, partial lower Dec. 2, 2002)

      #2; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 15:44:00 GMT
    • Hi Frisfluf, :wave:

      Sorry to hear about your ordeal. I know this is something you won't want to hear but I get the impression your dentist is not good at treating denture patients and fitting dentures. X-rays should have revealed some clues of your "fish hook" roots and the proximity of the sinus'. You should have been referred to an oral surgeon. If your dentist is an oral surgeon (mine was) he/she should have used a more appropriate sedation method or spread the extractions over a number of visits. You should never have had to endure what you did. But that, as they say, is water under the bridge. I hope that you trust your dentist enough to continue with your treatment plan.

      The first thing you need to do is manage your pain. Ask your dentist for a refill of your pain medicine, at least another weeks worth. It sounds like you're going to need it. If you're really in pain and he/she refuses then you're better off seeing another dentist that actually cares about whether you're in pain or not. Immediate dentures should be worn 24/7 (except for cleaning and rinsing) for some time after the extractions but not if they're painful to wear. Take them out if they hurt to wear. Rinse your mouth with salt water often (about a teaspoon of salt to a cup of water). It promotes healing and is actually quite soothing. Ice packs could help reduce swelling as well.

      The "hores teeth" effect is a common complaint. It's usually a result of the gums being swollen and pushing the dentures up for the lower denture and down for the upper denture. Your dentist shouldn't have given you a soft reline so soon after the extractions either. Most new denture wearers have their first soft reline after two or three weeks when the swelling from extractions is gone and the gums begin to resorb (shrink). If anything, the soft reline probably only made your "horse teeth" effect worse by adding more thickness between your gums and the denture. If you still have "horse teeth" after all the swelling is gone and your gums are resorbing then you'll know there is a problem with the dentures. Try to be patient until then.

      It sounds like your initial healing period will be longer than normal. But normal or not, healing from multiple extractions and adapting to dentures will take time. What's most important for you now is to get relief from your pain and have your gums heal properly. Dentures can be adjusted or remade to fit properly so that should be a secondary consideration at this point. If you have any other questions please ask. Good luck!

      Yos

      (full upper, partial lower Dec. 2, 2002)

      Hey everyone

      I too am a new immediate denture wearer. Two weeks tomorrow. Have a full upper and partial lower. What a totally life altering experience. It does get a little easier every day. Had teeth extracted on the 12th, went in on 13th for checkup and back again on 17th for another checkup and adjustment. YOS, you have a partial lower also. Do your front denture teeth rest on your lower gum? When I insert the lower denture the teeth rest on my gum, but when I insert the upper and close my mouth the front lower teeth pop up and off the gum. I spoke to the dentist about this and he says they will not fit tight. Makes no sense to me. You have become the denture expert in my eyes...I've been following from a previous thread. These messages have helped me through this ordeal more than you will ever know.

      Warmly

      2Treevers

      #3; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 15:45:00 GMT
    • Hi 2Treevers,

      After two weeks it sounds like you're making good progress. I can't remember exactly how my uppers and lowers aligned in the first couple of weeks. I only have a recollection of how big & bulky the dentures felt in my mouth and that I could barely talk never mind eat :D It was after my first soft reline that I started paying more attention to how the denture should fit.

      Until you've had your first soft reline don't expect much in the way of a decent fit or bite. And a soft reline isn't much good until the swelling in your gums have gone down and have moved into the resorption (shrinking) stage. After a soft reline the denture should sit snugly on the lower gums. The reline material will fill any gaps and irregularities in shape between your healing gums and the inside surface of the denture. The molars of the uppers and lowers should press together solidly and evenly without making the denture tip in any direction (side to side, front to back etc). When I press my teeth together and run my tongue along the inside of the denture the top and bottom teeth more or less line up along the molars. At the front I have a slight overbite where the upper front teeth extends slightly beyond the lower front teeth (if the upper and lower front teeth pressed together the molars wouldn't press together). Pressing your teeth together or closing your mouth shouldn't dislodge the other denture. You might find yourself knocking the denture off when you eat or speak but that's a part of the normal learning curve of adjusting to dentures. If you haven't had a soft reline yet don't worry too much about the fit or alignment. I had my first soft reline 3 weeks after extractions. Some dentists do them sooner, some later. The denture should fit properly after the soft reline though. If it doesn't then something is amiss.

      If you have any other questions please ask. In the meantime, good luck and keep smiling now that you can :)

      Yos

      #4; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 15:46:00 GMT
    • Thanks for the info Yos. I did already have a soft reline. At my second check up the dentist checked my mouth and bite and that is when I mentioned the bottom front teeth popping up. My bite seems to be fine. Top and bottom molars line up perfectly. Once the bottom fronts pop up they don't go back down again. I mentioned this to dentist too and my concern that the bottom fronts were much taller than the "real teeth" I still have. He simply ground down the denture teeth and then checked my bite again. Needless to say they are still much taller than the "real teeth" which looks pretty funny. I will definitely mention it to him again on my next visit. I am scheduled to go in Jan 5 for the lab reline. I (after reading your comments) feel this may be too soon. It's only eight weeks. I will be without teeth for a day. EEEEEEEEK!!! Am going to buy some surgical masks to wear and will not be going to work. I do plan on going in before the Jan date to have him check the bottoms. Can't wait to have good fitting teeth.

      Thanks again for all the info. You are the denture guru. I have been helped tremendously by the message boards.

      Warmly,

      2Treevers

      #5; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 15:47:00 GMT
    • Hi again 2Teevers, :wave:

      The lab reline (hard reline) after 8 weeks is WAY too soon. Consider this. When getting dentures the traditional way the person goes without teeth for a minimum of 3 months before getting dentures.

      I had soft relines at 3 weeks, 2 months and then 3 months. I had a hard reline done at 6 months. I have a one year checkup on the 9th of December and I will need a soft reline done at that time too. If you're paying extra for these relines you should reconsider when you have them done. If you have the hard reline done at 8 weeks your dentures will probably be loose again at 12 weeks.

      I hope you can sort out your problem with the lower denture. Could it be that the sides of the denture are too deep and is being pushed up somehow? It sounds like one of those mysteries that only a dentist or denturist can figure out what is causing the problem.

      For what it's worth, I hated going without my teeth on hard reline day too. I just drove home and then back to the dentist when it was time to pick them up. The office staff was also kind enough to sit me in a dentist chair to wait in instead of in the public waiting room. I intend to have another pair of dentures made so that I never find myself in that kind of situation again.

      Good luck! And keep smiling!!

      Yos

      #6; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 15:48:00 GMT
    • Happy Turkey Day,

      Yea...eight weeks seems way too soon for me too. I know I will be going back to the dentist before the Jan 5 hard reline date so I will discuss this with him. He never mentioned anything about an extra charge so I am now going to find out about that also. I was told that all adjustments for a year were included in the initial cost. Seventeen extractions and immediate upper and lower dentures were almost $4000. I hope the hard reline is included but I really don't want to find myself toothless two or more times during the year. I definitely have some questions for the dentist that need to be addressed.

      I was a little apprehensive about eating Thanksgiving dinner with the family today. All went well. I was able to eat most everything except the meat (which I am not ready to tackle yet) or the celery. Everything else on the menu I tried and did quite well if I do say so myself. I even treated myself to pumpkin pie, sans the crust. I hope you enjoyed your dinner as well.

      Have you ever tried using Cushion Grip on your dentures? I don't need to use anything on the lowers but the uppers get pretty loose (mainly because I am producing an excessive amount of saliva. My mouth most times feels like Niagra Falls). I used Cushion Grip this morning for the first time and the uppers were totally comfortable and stayed in place ALL DAY!!! Unfortunately there was a down side. My gums and palate started tingling the moment I inserted the upper denture. All day long I had a tingly, almost numb feeling in my mouth. No itching or swelling or anything really severe, but just a really strange tingling and taste. It figures doesn't it. You find something that really holds and it is not perfect. The product is supposed to last for four days. It is supposed to hold up to brushing and soaking. I will have to see as they are soaking now. I am hoping that the soak will kind of tame down the strength of the product. I will just have to see. Have you ever had something like this happen?

      Gobble, gobble,

      2Treevers

      UPDATE!!! After soaking the tingling has gone away. YIPPEE!! This product is for me. I can handle a day of numbness and tingling for the fit I am enjoying.

      #7; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 15:49:00 GMT
    • Hi again 2Teevers, :wave:

      Thanks for the Thanksgiving Day wishes and congratulations on getting to eat most of your Thanksgiving dinner. You've no doubt found out that there's a lot of food out there that really doesn't need much, if any, chewing. In another couple of weeks you'll be eating more or less normally. You'll be enjoying all the treats that Christmas has to offer :D

      I hope your costs include the hard reline. Hard relines start at about $120 US per denture at the discount chains (like Affordable Dentures) and go up from there. The other down side to having a hard reline is that you have to work out the sore spots all over again. That's even more of a hassle than going without teeth for a day :( You don't want to be having a hard reline more often than is necessary.

      Your saliva production should settle down once your mouth gets used to the denture. Your brain still thinks the denture is a foreign object :D I find it interesting that you're using cushion grips instead of adhesive which most people seem to reach for first. Anyway, if the cushion grips are medicated in any way that might explain the tingling you were feeling. The sensation may have been enhanced if some of your extraction sites haven't healed 100%. I haven't tried cushion grips. As a matter of fact, I don't even use adhesive. I do have a "Denturite" soft liner in my lower denture though. I had a tendency to knock it off with my tongue and the liner help the denture to grip my gums a little better.

      I hope you can get to the bottom of the lower denture popping up. Otherwise it sounds like you're adapting with few problems. If they still had the thumbs up icon I would put it here :D Good luck!

      Yos

      #8; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 15:50:00 GMT
    • Hi,

      Just wanted to send an update. I made it a week and 2 days looking like "Mr. Ed". :D The denturist wasn't in but I saw a regular dentist who suggested not wearing my bottom denture. The bite was correct in it but the teeth are not aligned right. He said that the denturist might be able to adjust the teeth or he would make a new denture. Either way I'll be happier with a set of teeth that are appealing. Luckily its not real noticable when I talk that I'm not wearing dentures on the bottom. Just have to be careful when I laugh. It feels sooooo good not to wear them after suffering a week wearing ill fitting dentures. My tops feel great and have nice suction on them and I forget that they are not real teeth.

      I go in Thursday to the denturist. The bottoms are healing faster than the tops because they are uncovered I think.

      I do have a question though. I have a bad smell and taste when I take out my top denture. I don't have one when the denture is in, and I asked my husband if he can smell anything when my denture is in but he doesn't. Is this just because of all my extractions? I brush the roof of my mouth and my tooth 2X's a day and swish salt water at least 4x's a day. No pain so I don't think I have an infection,plus I am on a antibiotic because of a root exposing my sinus.

      Eating is not really a problem for me. Even with no bottom denture I can use my tongue and mash food up on my top denture and swallow. Had waffles and eggs tonight for dinner. The waffles had syrup and powdered sugar on them which I haven't been able to enjoy for years because the sugar hurt my teeth....I felt like I was in heaven eating that. :bouncing:

      frisfluf

      #9; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 15:51:00 GMT
    • Hi Fris- good work sticking with it. Do what ever the dentist tells you to do. I am sort of surprised they told you to leave the lower denture out.

      The odor is probably from tissue healing under the denture. The dried blood and dead gum tissue needs air and water to clear up. It may help to take the denture out and rinse more frequently. Do you have stitches? Also massaging the gums helps get rid of dead tissue. What instructions did they give you about leaving the dentures out for various periods of time? Some say keep them in all the time, some say rest your mouth. Your dentist will know what is best for you. Take care.

      #10; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 15:52:00 GMT
    • Sandybeech-

      The dentist said that since I didn't have any swelling it was ok to leave the dentures out of my mouth, plus the fact that the bottoms just don't fit it was majorly killing my gums to keep them in. The uppers he said I can keep them out at night if I wish, but most people like to keep them in for a few weeks until they are use to them. He did say in the long run that it is better to take them out at night to promote healthier gums, but that it is a personal choice on what makes you comfortable.

      Last night I did sleep without the tops. That felt weird, but good. ;) I noticed that my stitiches are not dissolving as fast on the top under the denture as they are on the bottom with no denture on them and thought that might heal my gums faster.

      Yep I think the odor is dead skin cells, because I do get a white skin coating when cleaning my gums, but that too is getting better each day. Thanks!!

      frisfluf

      Hi Fris- good work sticking with it. Do what ever the dentist tells you to do. I am sort of surprised they told you to leave the lower denture out.

      The odor is probably from tissue healing under the denture. The dried blood and dead gum tissue needs air and water to clear up. It may help to take the denture out and rinse more frequently. Do you have stitches? Also massaging the gums helps get rid of dead tissue. What instructions did they give you about leaving the dentures out for various periods of time? Some say keep them in all the time, some say rest your mouth. Your dentist will know what is best for you. Take care.

      #11; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 15:53:00 GMT